Fall 2017 Events

Workshop

As Luck Would Have It: Discovery in the Digital Age

Deb Verhoeven
September 19 12:00–1:20 PM

Discovery and innovation in humanities research has traditionally rested on researchers making serendipitous connections by meandering along knowledge trails and proposing unexpected conceptual links. Emerging digital research tools are producing even richer opportunities for connectivity in the humanities but are often designed for efficient information retrieval rather than serendipitous discovery. Interrogation techniques based on networked information models or collection visualisations as well as more general discovery tools offer promising new avenues for discovery but don't always align with approaches to the production of knowledge used by humanities scholars. This workshop will engage participants in a computational platform specifically designed to co-create a new and imaginatively revised "ordering" of the world.

Deb Verhoeven is Associate Dean of Engagement and Innovation at University of Technology Sydney and the Director of the Humanities Networked Infrastructure (HuNI) Project.

Photo credit: © James Verhoeven, creator Andrew Beveridge

 

Guest Lecture

Drawing the Line

Deb Verhoeven
September 20 4:30–6:00 PM

What happens when the data gets graphic?

What does it mean to give shape to relationships? Can we recognize the quality of relationships by their shape? What if we could use data to “see” the contours of injustice? And if the answer is yes (or even maybe) then what are the implications of this? For how we understand ourselves? And for how we might redress the uneven patterns of interaction and co-existence that shape our day-to-day lives?

Dev Verhoeven

Deb Verhoeven is Associate Dean of Engagement and Innovation at University of Technology Sydney and the Director of the Humanities Networked Infrastructure (HuNI) Project.

Photo credit: © James Verhoeven, creator Andrew Beveridge

Reception

Fall Open House

September 25 4:30–6:00 PM

Welcome back! Join us to catch up with old and new friends in the Princeton digital humanities community. Meet the center’s staff and our new postdoctoral and graduate fellows, and learn more about our new research projects, and check out our shiny new space on B Floor in Firestone Library. We are looking forward to seeing you! Light refreshments will be served.

Reading Group

Reading Group

Jim Casey
September 27 12:00–1:20 PM

This year, the CDH will convene a reading group to explore the public digital humanities. The group is open to all levels of expertise and particularly welcomes those who might be new to the CDH in Firestone Library. 

Each week we will pair an article or a set of brief readings with a notable public project or two. All readings & examples are online, linked below. Lunch will be provided.

RSVP to Jim Casey (jccasey@princeton.edu).

What are the public humanities?
Sheila A. Brennan, "Public, First." 
Steven Lubar, “Seven Rules for Public Humanists.” 
National Council of Public History, What is public history?
Example: CHNM, Histories of the National Mall

Workshop

Intro to DH

Jean Bauer
October 2 4:30–6:00 PM

Have you heard about Digital Humanities but don’t really know what it is? Do you think your research could benefit from digital methods and tools but aren’t sure what to do next? Then this workshop is for you!

Jean Bauer, Associate Director of CDH, will take you through a short tour of DH methods, tools, and projects, all designed to help you sharpen your own ideas and think through next steps. There will be time for questions at the end, and all participants are encouraged to reach out to Bauer or another CDH researcher for a project consultation.

Workshop

Data Visualization

Jean Bauer
October 9 4:30–6:00 PM

Ever wondered what data visualization is, or wanted to know what it can do? Come along to the CDH for a workshop with Associate Director Jean Bauer on two easy-to-learn, easy-to-use visualization platforms. Together we’ll look at Palladio and RAW, two online platforms that require no installation, and learn how to map movements, make network graphs, flow charts, scatter plots and more. Along the way we’ll learn about faceting and filtering your data so you can have maximum control over what information you display and how. No prior knowledge or experience required; come along and bring your laptop if possible!

Guest Lecture

Digital History in Germany: Challenges, Chances, Developments

Peter Haslinger
October 10 4:30–5:30 PM
Digital History in Germany: Challenges, Chances, Developments
This presentation will give an overview of recent developments in  
Germany in the field of digital history as part of the digital humanities. 
It will not only address themes, tendencies and existing structures, 
but will also reflect on the institutional future and the political 
framing when it comes to challenges in the field of digital humanities 
– like funding, questions of sustainability, citizen science, or 
interdisciplinary and transnational cooperation in a European and 
trans-Atlantic context. It will demonstrate cutting edge developments 
on the example of a portal that combines history, art history, digital 
heritage, and virtual reconstruction.

Peter Haslinger is professor for the history of Eastern Europe at 
Justus-Liebig-University Giessen and director of the Herder-Institute 
for Historical Research on East Central Europe, an institute of the 
Leibniz-Association. Until recently, he was also chair of the working 
group for digital history in the realm of the German Historian’s 
Association.
This event is sponsored in part by the CDH Slavic DH Working Group. 
Reading Group

Reading Group: #BlkTwitterstorians: Building a Digital Community

Jim Casey
October 11 12:00–1:20 PM

This year, the CDH will convene a reading group to explore the public digital humanities. The group is open to all levels of expertise and particularly welcomes those who might be new to the CDH in Firestone Library. 

Each week we will pair an article or a set of brief readings with a notable public project or two. All readings & examples are online, linked below. Lunch will be provided.

RSVP to Jim Casey (jccasey@princeton.edu).

Building Communities
Aleia M. Brown & Joshua Crutchfield, "Black Scholars Matter: #BlkTwitterstorians Building a Digital Community." 
Example: #BlkTwitterstorians

Workshop

Puerto Rico Mapathon

Nora Benedict
Jim Casey
October 18 12:00–4:00 PM

Puerto Rico Disaster Relief | Princeton Mapathon Oct 18 – Open House 12-4 PM

Next week, we are holding an event on the Princeton campus to assist relief efforts in Puerto Rico and other areas impacted by recent disasters. Many aid groups report difficulty delivering much-needed goods and services to remote areas because currently-available digital maps are inadequate.

Join us on Wednesday to improve those maps through the Open Street Maps project. No experience or knowledge is required, only a laptop: come when you can, leave when you must! Light refreshments and snacks will be served.

Learn more about mapathons happening across the country from PBS NewsHour. 

Puerto Rico Mapathon - View flyer
Oct. 18, 2017
Open from 12-4 PM
Center for Digital Humanities (Firestone Library, Floor B)

Co-conveners include:
Elvia Arroyo-Ramirez, Princeton University Library, @elvia_arroyo
Nadirah Mansour, Near Eastern Studies, @NAMansour26
Nora Benedict, Center for Digital Humanities, @NoraCBenedict
Jim Casey, Center for Digital Humanities, @jimccasey1

Contact jccasey@princeton.edu with any questions.

View the Quick Guide to participating in the mapathon at home: Quick Guide to Mapping Puerto Rico

Panel

Crowdsourcing Cultural Heritage Communities: The Prozhito Project in Perspective

Jim Casey
Nataliya Tyshkevich
October 19 4:00–5:00 PM

Join us for a conversation about crowdsourcing, public humanities, and organizing volunteer communities in various national and cultural contexts.

Nataliya Tyshkevich from Prozhito, an electronic corpus of Russian-language diaries from the 18th-21st centuries, will discuss her experiences with the CDH’s Jim Casey. Jim has led the award-winning Colored Conventions Project, which invites volunteers to transcribe records of nineteenth-century African American political organizing.

Nataliya Tyshkevich (Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences) is the Project Manager for Prozhito. She is a computational linguist by training and is part of a research group on social network analysis of Russian drama. Nataliya’s academic interests include digital public history, genre studies, information extraction and markup practices.

Jim Casey is the Perkins Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for Digital Humanities at Princeton. He has expertise in print culture, nineteenth-century American literature, African American studies, and the history of editing. Jim co-founded and led the Colored Conventions Project, and his next project, A Committee of the Whole: Social Networks of the Early Black Republic of Letters blends public humanities with digital research methods to rediscover a longer history of collective Black activism in the United States.

This event is supported by the CDH Slavic DH Working Group and Public Digital Humanities Reading Group. It is connected to the Slavic Department conference, "Grafting the Self" (October 19-21, 2017).

Panel

Open Access Panel and Viewing of Hamilton's America

Jean Bauer
October 23 4:30–6:00 PM

Open Access in "The Room Where It Happens": Teaching, Research, and Publishing on Lin Manuel Miranda's hit musical Hamilton

Join us for a viewing of the PBS documentary, Hamilton's America, proceeded by a panel of local experts, discussing the musical's impact on teaching and research in history, English, and theater, including how to use copyright materials for Open Access scholarship. Popcorn and soda will be served.

Reading Group

Reading Group: Open Access & Indigenous Knowledge Systems

Jim Casey
October 25 12:00–1:20 PM

This year, the CDH will convene a reading group to explore the public digital humanities. The group is open to all levels of expertise and particularly welcomes those who might be new to the CDH in Firestone Library. 

Each week we will pair an article or a set of brief readings with a notable public project or two. All readings & examples are online, linked below. Lunch will be provided.

RSVP to Jim Casey (jccasey@princeton.edu).

Open Access
Kimberly Christen, "Does Information Really Want to be Free? Indigenous Knowledge Systems and the Question of Openness." (PDF link) 
Examples: Dawnland Voices & Digital Index of North American Archaeology (DINAA)

Reading Group

Reading Group: Monuments & Memory

Jim Casey
November 8 12:00–1:20 PM

This year, the CDH will convene a reading group to explore the public digital humanities. The group is open to all levels of expertise and particularly welcomes those who might be new to the CDH in Firestone Library. 

Each week we will pair an article or a set of brief readings with a notable public project or two. All readings & examples are online, linked below. Lunch will be provided.

RSVP to Jim Casey (jccasey@princeton.edu).

Memory & Monuments
James F. Brooks and Cheryl Jiménez Frei, "Monuments, Memory, Politics, and Our Publics."
Example: Monument Lab of Philadelphia, (in-progress 9/16-11/19)

Workshop

Design Thinking

Xinyi Li
November 8 4:30–6:00 PM

You may have gotten a taste of the buzz term design thinking, and left feeling intrigued, skeptical, or confused. Join this workshop to learn about the origin story of design thinking, and demystify the term. We’ll view the rise of the Design Thinking critically, and put it into the context of human-centered design, and social design, and design research. We’ll learn some frameworks and methods with cases studies, practice in groups with a set of tools, and think about how could design thinking relate to research and practice in other fields.

Guest Lecture

Ancient World Research and Tools in Synergy

Mark Depauw
November 14 4:30–6:00 PM

“To use tools well, we must, in some real sense, understand them better than the tool maker. The best kind of tools are therefore the ones that we make ourselves.” Dennis Tenen, Debates in DH 2016

Starting from the example of Trismegistos (www.trismegistos.org), this talk will discuss how digital tools are transforming antiquity research. Heuristics used to be the most time-consuming task of the scholar, but are increasingly a matter of a few mouse-clicks. This implies that scholars of the ancient world will have more time to do what lies at the core of the humanities: asking questions and study ancient society and culture critically. On the other hand some of these new questions can only be answered by developing new tools.

Co-sponsored by the Program in the Ancient World and the Center for Digital Humanities. Full event details.

Workshop

Geo-referencing Literary Texts and Historic Maps: A Pelagios and Pleiades Workshop

Sarah Bond
November 15 12:00–1:20 PM

Almost every text we work with—historical or otherwise—has a spatial component to it. Whether it is mapping Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein or exploring the margins of the Mediterranean in Edward Gibbon’s The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, geography is an important part of many texts. This workshop explores the textual annotation tool within Pelagios.org’s Recogito feature, which allows professors, students, and the public to annotate, tag, and visualize locations from texts automatically. This workshop will teach you how to upload texts and easily create interactive maps to allow deeper engagement with texts. It will also introduce attendees to the basic tenets of linked open data as applied within the realm of HGIS.

Lunch will be provided.

Sarah Bond is an Assistant Professor of Classics at the University of Iowa, where she is also an affiliated scholar with the Digital Scholarship & Publishing Studio. She received her BA in Classics and History with a minor in Classical Archaeology from the University of Virginia (2005) and her PhD in Ancient History from the University of North Carolina (2011). She is the author of numerous articles on tradesmen and law in the later Roman empire. Her recent book, Trade and Taboo: Disreputable Professions in the Roman Mediterranean, was published with the University of Michigan Press in 2016. Additionally, she teaches GIS workshops and digital pedagogy as an associate editor for the Pleiades Project online gazetteer (a digitization of the Barrington Atlas) and is a pedagogy editor for the Pelagios Project. She is a regular columnist at Forbes, a contributor to Hyperallergic, and a frequent blogger.

World - Outline by FreeVectorMaps.com

Guest Lecture

Digital Humanities and Social Justice

Sarah Bond
November 15 4:30–6:00 PM

Although people have been caught up in the correct definition of the term "digital humanities," we should perhaps be more concerned with the how of DH rather than the what. This talk focuses on how digital approaches—3D modeling, augmented reality, GIS, and textual analysis, to name just a few—have begun to reveal evidence for social inequality, misogyny, racism, and marginalization. This talk highlights just a few local and international DH projects working to these ends; from redlining maps to the statistical analysis of the gender pay gap at public universities. Clearly, it is not about who is and is not a digital humanist that is the real issue in 2017. All humanists—digital or otherwise—have the power to band together in order to bring about transparency and hasten social awareness. If democracy truly "dies in darkness," then perhaps DH can contribute some flashlights to the cause.

Sarah Bond is an Assistant Professor of Classics at the University of Iowa, where she is also an affiliated scholar with the Digital Scholarship & Publishing Studio. She received her BA in Classics and History with a minor in Classical Archaeology from the University of Virginia (2005) and her PhD in Ancient History from the University of North Carolina (2011). She is the author of numerous articles on tradesmen and law in the later Roman empire. Her recent book, Trade and Taboo: Disreputable Professions in the Roman Mediterranean, was published with the University of Michigan Press in 2016. Additionally, she teaches GIS workshops and digital pedagogy as an associate editor for the Pleiades Project online gazetteer (a digitization of the Barrington Atlas) and is a pedagogy editor for the Pelagios Project. She is a regular columnist at Forbes, a contributor to Hyperallergic, and a frequent blogger.

World - Outline by FreeVectorMaps.com

Reading Group

Reading Group: Crowdsourcing

Jim Casey
November 29 12:00–1:20 PM

This year, the CDH will convene a reading group to explore the public digital humanities. The group is open to all levels of expertise and particularly welcomes those who might be new to the CDH in Firestone Library. 

Each week we will pair an article or a set of brief readings with a notable public project or two. All readings & examples are online, linked below. Lunch will be provided.

RSVP to Jim Casey (jccasey@princeton.edu).

Crowdsourcing
Mia Ridge, Introduction to Crowdsourcing Our Cultural Heritage (PDF link).
Examples: Smithsonian Transcription CenterTranscribe MinutesDIYHistoryBracero Archive, Old WeatherScribes of the Cairo Geniza (or any of the many dazzling projects on the Zooniverse).

Reading Group

Reading Group: Social Justice & Memory

Jim Casey
December 13 12:00–1:20 PM

This year, the CDH will convene a reading group to explore the public digital humanities. The group is open to all levels of expertise and particularly welcomes those who might be new to the CDH in Firestone Library. 

Each week we will pair an article or a set of brief readings with a notable public project or two. All readings & examples are online, linked below. Lunch will be provided.

RSVP to Jim Casey (jccasey@princeton.edu).

Year of Data

Reading Group

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