Upcoming Events

Course

Fall 2020 Course - Privacy, Publicity, and the Text Message

Grant R. Wythoff
August 31 - November 24

Privacy, Publicity, and the Text Message - AMS 343 / ENG 238 / HUM 342

W: 1:30-3:20 PM

This seminar will explore how we negotiate the distance between ourselves and others through text messages. Texts sustain an ambient intimacy that is increasingly redefining borders that range from the interpersonal--via anonymous mental health support--to the international--via reporting platforms for immigrant communities. What technical and social expectations of privacy do we operate with when sending a point-to-point message? How do novelists incorporate text messages into works of fiction? What does it mean that Frank Ocean can sing, "you text nothing like you look"?

View course details.

Course

Fall 2020 Course - Black Mirror: Race, Technology, and Justice

Ruha Benjamin
August 31 - November 24

Black Mirror: Race, Technology, and Justice - AAS 339 / EGR 339

M: 1:30-3:20 PM

Are robots racist? Is software sexist? Are neural networks neutral? From everyday apps to complex algorithms, technology has the potential to hide, speed up, and even deepen discrimination. Using the Black Mirror TV series as a starting point, we will explore a range of emerging technologies that encode inequity in digital platforms and automated decisions systems, and develop a conceptual toolkit to decode tech promises with sociologically informed skepticism. Students will apply design justice principles in a collaborative project and learn to communicate course insights to tech practitioners, policy makers, and the broader public.

View course details.

Working Group

Kickoff Meeting: East Asian Digital Humanities Working Group

September 28 4:30–5:30 PM

The CDH is excited to announce the formation of a new East Asian DH Working Group at Princeton, with support from the East Asian Studies Department. The Working Group plans to regularly organize meetings, workshops and other events over the academic year. We would like to invite you to a virtual kick-off meeting – registration is not required.

Sep 28, 2020 4:30 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

zoom link / join by telephone – meeting ID 2520754010, passcode EADH

In this first meeting, the group will share its plans for the coming weeks and months. A number of Princeton students, faculty and staff from a variety of disciplines working on different parts of East Asia have been invited to share in very short presentations their ongoing or planned DH projects, including:

  • Anna Shields (East Asian Studies)
  • Chan Yong Bu (East Asian Studies)
  • Gian Duri Rominger (East Asian Studies) / Nick Budak (Center for Digital Humanities)
  • Hannah Waight (Sociology) 
  • Caitlin Karyadi (Art & Archaeology)
  • Joshua Seufert (East Asian Library)

We hope that many of you will be able join us.

Best wishes,

Joshua Seufert, Xin Wen, Nick Budak

Past Events

Working Group

South Asia Digital Humanities: Chai and Chaat

June 10 11:00–12:00 PM

The South Asia DH Working Group invites you to a Zoom gathering of South Asia DH enthusiasts to hear lightning talks about current projects and opportunities at Princeton and to exchange ideas about areas of DH interest. Grab some chai, make a snack, and chat (chaat) with us!

Hosted by Amna Qayyum (PhD Candidate, History), Ellen Ambrosone (South Asian Studies Librarian) and Wafa Fatima Isfahani (Special Collections Assistant, NEC).

Register Here: https://tinyurl.com/y9a4yjg5 <https://tinyurl.com/y9a4yjg5>

Workshop

Introduction to HTRC for Text and Data Mining

July 7 10:00–11:30 AM

This virtual four-workshop series will allow attendees to gain experience with tools and data from the HathiTrust Research Center (HTRC). The Research Center facilitates text and data mining uses of the HathiTrust corpus. HathiTrust is a partnership of research libraries, and it is a digital library containing 17.3 million items digitized at the partner libraries. HTRC tools and data range from off-the-shelf options to more advanced offerings for experienced scholars. 

The workshops will be held via Zoom and will include a mix of hands-on, discussion, and presentation. We will utilize breakout rooms to support hands-on activities. You will not be required to install any software to participate in the workshops. The workshops are open to faculty, graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, librarians, and other academic staff.

Librarians who attend all four workshops will be invited to join a cohort of other librarians who are teaching with and about the Research Center. This cohort has access to additional support from HTRC, further training opportunities, and a community of their peers who are interested in HTRC. 

In this first of four workshops, we will explore the basics of HathiTrust as a data source and how to utilize HTRC as a resource for text and data mining. The workshop will address the various tools and services of the Research Center, and options for accessing text data from HathiTrust for text analysis research. The session will be helpful for those who want a general overview, or who want a solid foundation for the other workshops in the series. 

Co-sponsored by the Center for Digital Humanities and the Princeton Research Data Service

To request disability-related accommodations for this event, please contact pulcomm@princeton.edu at least 3 working days in advance. 

Workshop

HTRC Extracted Features Dataset

July 8 10:00–11:30 AM

This virtual four-workshop series will allow attendees to gain experience with tools and data from the HathiTrust Research Center (HTRC). The Research Center facilitates text and data mining uses of the HathiTrust corpus. HathiTrust is a partnership of research libraries, and it is a digital library containing 17.3 million items digitized at the partner libraries. HTRC tools and data range from off-the-shelf options to more advanced offerings for experienced scholars. 

The workshops will be held via Zoom and will include a mix of hands-on, discussion, and presentation. We will utilize breakout rooms to support hands-on activities. You will not be required to install any software to participate in the workshops. The workshops are open to faculty, graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, librarians, and other academic staff.

Librarians who attend all four workshops will be invited to join a cohort of other librarians who are teaching with and about the Research Center. This cohort has access to additional support from HTRC, further training opportunities, and a community of their peers who are interested in HTRC. 

In this second of four workshops, we will introduce you to the Extracted Features data model and the kinds of research it enables. HTRC recently released an updated version of the Extracted Features dataset (v.2.0) that includes 17+ million files, with each file representing a volume in the HathiTrust Digital Library. The Extracted Features files contain metadata about the volumes, as well as tokens (words), parts of speech, and their per-page counts. The dataset can be used for text analysis projects where access to the words and word-counts in a volume are expected by the algorithm, such as topic modeling or certain kinds of machine learning projects. This session will include a hands-on activity using the dataset.

Co-sponsored by the Center for Digital Humanities and the Princeton Research Data Service

To request disability-related accommodations for this event, please contact pulcomm@princeton.edu at least 3 working days in advance. 

Workshop

HTRC Data Capsules Environment

July 9 10:00–11:30 AM

This virtual four-workshop series will allow attendees to gain experience with tools and data from the HathiTrust Research Center (HTRC). The Research Center facilitates text and data mining uses of the HathiTrust corpus. HathiTrust is a partnership of research libraries, and it is a digital library containing 17.3 million items digitized at the partner libraries. HTRC tools and data range from off-the-shelf options to more advanced offerings for experienced scholars. 

The workshops will be held via Zoom and will include a mix of hands-on, discussion, and presentation. We will utilize breakout rooms to support hands-on activities. You will not be required to install any software to participate in the workshops. The workshops are open to faculty, graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, librarians, and other academic staff.

Librarians who attend all four workshops will be invited to join a cohort of other librarians who are teaching with and about the Research Center. This cohort has access to additional support from HTRC, further training opportunities, and a community of their peers who are interested in HTRC.

In this third of four workshops, we will introduce you to the HTRC’s capsule environment and how it can be used by intermediate and advanced researchers. An HTRC Data Capsule is a virtual machine with special security settings that allows researchers to access text data from HathiTrust, analyze it using the text and data mining methods of their choice, and then export only the results of their analysis. This session will include a hands-on activity using an HTRC Data Capsule.

Prerequisites: either the “Introduction to HTRC for Text and Data Mining” workshop, or some previous experience with HathiTrust or HTRC.

Co-sponsored by the Center for Digital Humanities and the Princeton Research Data Service

To request disability-related accommodations for this event, please contact pulcomm@princeton.edu at least 3 working days in advance. 

Discussion

From Analog to Digital: A Discussion with Prof. Sean Pue

September 17 4:30–5:30 PM

Join the South Asia Digital Humanities Working Group for a discussion with Prof. Sean Pue about his use of computational methods for the study of South Asian poetry, the Digital Humanities program at MSU, and other DH topics.  His presentation will be followed by a conversation with attendees, moderated by  Dr. Ellen Ambrosone (PUL).

Sean Pue is associate professor of Hindi Language and South Asian Literature and Culture at Michigan State University. He has served as the Director of the Digital Humanities program at Michigan State University and recently received a Mellon New Directions Fellowship to study linguistics and computer/data science for his research on poetic sound in South Asian poetry.

Please register here for the Zoom link: https://tinyurl.com/y22vm7tj

Information Session

Graduate Student Drop-in Open House

September 21 2:00–3:00 PM

The CDH will be hosting a drop-in open house for graduate students. If you’re a graduate student curious about digital humanities, if you have questions or an idea about a project, or if you’re invested in learning more about what we do at the CDH and the different ways you might get involved, please join us!

Zoom link for the graduate students drop-in hour:
https://princeton.zoom.us/j/92370737388?pwd=YTRFZXhFRXg2ZXVCdmgxbmNXNUlKQT09
Meeting ID: 923 7073 7388
Passcode: 392974

Year of Data

Reading Group

Co-Sponsor an Event