Upcoming Events

Panel

Collections as Data: Preserving Black Histories, Cultivating Black Futures

Jennifer Garcon
Amanda Henley
Synatra Smith
December 2 3:00–4:20 PM

Register here

Join us for a panel discussion, “Preserving Black Histories, Cultivating Black Futures, to launch the 2020–21 CDH-PUL Collections as Data series. 

Jennifer Garcon (University of Pennsylvania), an expert on community and public data, will facilitate a discussion with Amanda Henley (University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill), who will discuss On the Books: Jim Crow and Algorithms of Resistance, and Synatra Smith (Philadelphia Museum of Art) who will present her project, “Black Philly Multiverse.” 

 

Project Abstracts

On the Books: Jim Crow and Algorithms of Resistance is a collections as data and machine learning project of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Libraries with the goal of discovering Jim Crow and racially-based legislation signed into law in North Carolina between Reconstruction and the Civil Rights Movement (1866/67-1967).The project uses text mining and machine learning to identify racist language in legal documents, helping expose the wide-ranging effects of Jim/Jane Crow on the American South. We have coined the phrase “algorithms of resistance” in reference to Safiya Noble’s Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism (2018). If algorithms can reinforce racism, could we also use algorithms to fight racism? Instead of proliferating racist ideas, can algorithms help us better study the history of race and advocate for justice?

Black Philly Multiverse is an interactive exhibition based on existing Black spaces within Philadelphia, past and present, that demonstrates how virtual reality can be used as a cultural heritage tool. The VR experience will take the traditional exhibition out of the gallery and instead function as a curated cafe, book store, social club, etc. to highlight a specific cultural phenomenon at a specific moment or moments in time. The objective is to demonstrate the creation, perpetuation, and transformation of the socio-political intersectional Black cultural landscape with special attention to the ways in which virtual and physical space are used as environments to conceptually and practically transform Black identification processes, as well as the material culture that contributes to this phenomenon.  

 

Panelist Bios

Jennifer Garcon is Digital Scholarship Library at the University of Pennsylvania Libraries, research associate with the Library of Congress’s Radio Preservation Task Force, and a 2020–21 Mellon Research Fellow at the Price Lab for Digital Humanities at UPenn. As part of her work, Jennifer is collaborating with faculty members to create an archive of Black Philly that will help care for vulnerable data published by members of the community, particularly in neighborhoods that are rapidly changing due to gentrification and other forces. She previously served as CLIR Bollinger Fellow in Public and Community Data Preservation at UPenn. Jennifer earned a Ph.D. in History from the University of Miami. 

Amanda Henley is Head of Digital Services at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where she oversees the Research Hub at Davis Library. She is co-Principal Investigator and Project Lead of “On the Books: Jim Crow and the Algorithms of Resistance,” a collections as data and machine learning project with the goal of discovering Jim Crow and racially-based legislation signed into law in North Carolina between Reconstruction and the Civil Rights Movement. Amanda has been a librarian at UNC since 2002. She holds an M.A. in geography from UNC.

Synatra Smith is CLIR Fellow for Digital Curation and Scholarship in African American Studies at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. In this role, she is leveraging data and research about the Philadelphia Museum of Art’s African-American art collection to expand how the museum presents and thinks about its holdings, and collaborating with Temple University Libraries’ digital humanities research center to unite the data and collections at the two institutions. Synatra came to the Museum from the Prince George’s African American Museum and Cultural Center in North Brentwood, Maryland. She earned her Ph.D. in Global and Sociocultural Studies from Florida International University.

Reading Group

"Pointed Roofs" by Dorothy Richardson

December 7 11:00–12:00 PM

The “Shakespeare and Company Project” conducts a discussion of the first book of Richardson's 13-volume "Pilgrimage" series.

The discussion is part of a series of explorations of titles frequently borrowed from Shakespeare and Company in Paris. Shakespeare and Company, an English-language bookshop and lending library in Paris, was opened by American Sylvia Beach in 1919. The shop became the home away from home for a community of expatriate writers and artists now known as the Lost Generation. 

The book is freely accessible here

Presented in partnership with Princeton Public Library.

Made possible, in part, by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Register here.

Reading Group

"Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man" by James Joyce

January 4 11:00–12:00 PM

The “Shakespeare and Company Project” conducts a discussion of Joyce's first novel as part of a series of explorations of titles frequently borrowed from Shakespeare and Company in Paris.

Shakespeare and Company, an English-language bookshop and lending library in Paris, was opened by American Sylvia Beach in 1919. The shop became the home away from home for a community of expatriate writers and artists now known as the Lost Generation. 

The book is freely accessible here

Presented in partnership with Princeton Public Library.

Made possible, in part, by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Register here.

Past Events

Reading Group

"The Garden Party and Other Stories" by Katherine Mansfield

November 2 11:00–12:00 PM

The “Shakespeare and Company Project” conducts a discussion of Mansfield's collection of short stories.

The discussion is the first in a series of explorations of titles frequently borrowed from Shakespeare and Company in Paris. Shakespeare and Company, an English-language bookshop and lending library in Paris, was opened by American Sylvia Beach in 1919. The shop became the home away from home for a community of expatriate writers and artists now known as the Lost Generation. 

The book is available online.

Presented in partnership with Princeton Public Library

Made possible, in part, by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Please register.

Discussion

Introduction to Mapping and GIS: Translating Humanities Data

Meher Ali
Tsering Shawa
November 12 4:30–5:30 PM

The South Asia Digital Humanities Working Group invites you to for a conversation about GIS mapping and its applications for historical or other humanities-centered research. Meher Ali (PhD student, History), and Wangyal Shawa (GIS and Map Librarian, PUL) will lead an informal discussion around the uses and methods of GIS technology, and the possibilities (and challenges) of translating traditional archival or textual source material into GIS-friendly data.

This is the second event in the South Asia DH series ‘From Analog to Digital’. Please stay tuned for our programming throughout the academic year.

Please register at the following link:

https://tinyurl.com/y5cpqgaq

Colloquium

4th Princeton Annual Humanities Colloquium (PAHC) on Africa and Digital Humanities

November 16 10:00–3:00 PM

DAY ONE

KEYNOTE: Address and Responses (November 16, 10am-12pm ET)

Speaker:

Evelyn Fogwe Chibaka – University of Buea/CaPROWN(link is external) –efogwe@yahoo.com

Respondents:

Angel David Nieves – Northeastern University/Apartheid Heritages(link is external) – a.nieves@northeastern.edu

Bhakti Shringarpure – University of Connecticut/Warscapes(link is external) – bhakti.shringarpure@uconn.edu

Mark Anthony Neal – Duke University/Left of Black(link is external) – man9@duke.edu

Wendy Laura Belcher – Princeton University/PEMM(link is external) – wbelcher@princeton.edu

Chair: Simon Gikandi – Princeton University/PAHC – sgikandi@princeton.edu

 

Lunch Break Recorded Digital Initiative Showcase (November 16, 12:45pm-12:55pm)

Majimaji War Heritage: Nancy Rushohora – Stellenbosch University – nancy@sun.ac.za

 

PANEL 1: Theorizing and Teaching of African Digital Humanities (November 16, 1pm-3pm)

James Yeku – The University of Kansas/Digital Nollywood(link is external) – jyeku@ku.edu

Hlonipha Mokoena – University of the Witwatersrand/WISER(link is external) – Hlonipha.Mokoena@wits.ac.za

Kwabena Opoku-Agyemang – University of Ghana/SIT(link is external) – kwabena.oa@gmail.com

Ainehi Edoro-Glines – University of Wisconsin-Madison/Brittle Paper(link is external) – aedoro@wisc.edu

Discussant: Laila Hussein Moustafa – University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign/CGS(link is external) – lhoussei@illinois.edu

 

*Organizer: Chambi Chachage – Princeton University – chachage@princeton.edu

Registration: https://princeton.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_g_LOQ78_QcCiRASkWNgvdg

Colloquium

4th Princeton Annual Humanities Colloquium (PAHC) on Africa and Digital Humanities

November 17 10:00–3:00 PM

DAY TWO

PANEL 2: Methods and Sources for African Digital Humanities (November 17, 10am-12pm)

Chao Tayiana – African Digital Heritage(link is external) – chao@africandigitalheritage.com

Eleni Castro – Boston University/Ajami Project – elenic@bu.edu

Tunde Ope-Davies (Opeibi) – University of Lagos/CEDHUL(link is external) – bopeibi@unilag.edu.ng

Nontsikelelo Mutiti – Virginia Commonwealth University/Black Chalk & Co.(link is external) – nkmutiti@vcu.edu

Discussant: Peter Alegi – Michigan State University/Africa Past & Present(link is external) – alegi@msu.edu

 

Lunch Break Recorded Digital Initiative Showcase (November 17, 12:45pm-12:55pm)

The Africa I Know (TAIK): Adji Bousso Dieng – Princeton University – adji@google.com

 

PANEL 3: Writing and Publishing in African Digital Humanities (November 17, 1pm-3pm)

Ng’ang’a Wahu-Mũchiri – University of Nebraska-Lincoln – muchiri@unl.edu

Kim Gallon – Purdue University/Black Press Research Collective(BPRC)(link is external) - kgallon@purdue.edu

Msia Kibona Clark –Howard University/Hip Hop in Africa Blog & Podcast(link is external) – msia.clark@howard.edu

Sean Jacobs – The New School/Africa is a Country(link is external) – jacobss@newschool.edu

Discussant:  Lorelle D. Semley – College of the Holy Cross – lsemley@holycross.edu

 

*Organizer: Chambi Chachage – Princeton University – chachage@princeton.edu

Registration: https://princeton.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_g_LOQ78_QcCiRASkWNgvdg

Guest Lecture

Anita L. Allen – How Privacy Got Its Race

November 17 12:30–1:30 PM

Please join the webinar here.

This talk is co-sponsored by CITP and The Center for Digital Humanities at Princeton.

There is increasing interest in understanding the difference race makes for the enjoyment of privacy and the protection of privacy rights. This talk surveys issues and concerns at the intersection of race relations and privacy — values and rights. Who gets to be shielded or secluded? Who gets watched; gets to observe? Who gets profiled, who ignored? Who gets to be invisible or is forced into invisibility? The focus will be the United States and Blacks but parallel structures of power and domination can be seen in China with respect to its minorities.

Bio:

Anita L. Allen is an internationally renowned expert on privacy law and ethics, and is recognized for contributions to legal philosophy, women’s rights, and diversity in higher education. In July 2013, Anita was appointed Penn’s Vice Provost for Faculty, and in 2015, Chair of the Penn Provost’s Advisory Council on Arts, Culture and the Humanities. From 2010 to 2017, she served on President Obama’s Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues. She was presented the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Electronic Privacy Information Center in 2015 and elected to the National Academy of Medicine in 2016. In 2017 Anita was elected vice-president/president elect of the Eastern Division of the American Philosophical Association. In 2015 she was on the summer faculty of the School of Criticism and Theory at Cornell. A two-year term as an associate of the Johns Hopkins Humanities Center concluded in 2018. In 2019, Anita was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and received an honorary doctoral degree from Tilburg University. She received her law degree from Harvard and her Ph.D. from Michigan in Philosophy.

Her books include Unpopular Privacy: What Must We Hide (Oxford, 2011); Privacy Law and Society (Thomson/West, 2017); The New Ethics: A Guided Tour of the 21st Century Moral Landscape (Miramax/Hyperion, 2004); and Why Privacy Isn’t Everything: Feminist Reflections on Personal Accountability (Rowman and Littlefield, 2003).

To request accommodations for a disability please contact Jean Butcher, butcher@princeton.edu, at least one week prior to the event.

Guest Lecture

Rediscovering the Lost Generation: Inside the World of Shakespeare and Company

November 18 7:00–8:30 PM

Joshua Kotin, director of the Shakespeare and Company Project, and Keri Walsh, editor of "The Letters of Sylvia Beach," discuss the Lost Generation and the books they loved.

The Shakespeare and Company Project is a digital humanities initiative that brings the world of Shakespeare and Company to life.

From the website: In 1919, an American named Sylvia Beach opened Shakespeare and Company, an English-language bookshop and lending library in Paris. Almost immediately, it became the home away from home for a community of expatriate writers and artists now known as the Lost Generation. In 1922, she published James Joyce’s "Ulysses" under the Shakespeare and Company imprint, a feat that made her — and her bookshop and lending library — famous around the world. In the 1930s, she catered increasingly to French intellectuals, supplying English-language books and magazines from the recently rediscovered "Moby-Dick" to the latest issues of The New Yorker. In 1941, she preemptively closed Shakespeare and Company after refusing to sell her last copy of Joyce's "Finnegans Wake" to a Nazi officer.

Presented in partnership with the Princeton Public Library and the Historical Society of Princeton.

Register here.

Year of Data

Collections as Data Series

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