Upcoming Events

Panel

Crowdsourcing Cultural Heritage Communities: The Prozhito Project in Perspective

Jim Casey

Join us for a conversation about crowdsourcing, public humanities, and organizing volunteer communities in various national and cultural contexts.

Nataliya Tyshkevich from Prozhito, an electronic corpus of Russian-language diaries from the 18th-21st centuries, will discuss her experiences with the CDH’s Jim Casey. Jim has led the award-winning Colored Conventions Project, which invites volunteers to transcribe records of nineteenth-century African American political organizing.

Nataliya Tyshkevich (Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences) is the Project Manager for Prozhito. She is a computational linguist by training and is part of a research group on social network analysis of Russian drama. Nataliya’s academic interests include digital public history, genre studies, information extraction and markup practices.

Jim Casey is the Perkins Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for Digital Humanities at Princeton. He has expertise in print culture, nineteenth-century American literature, African American studies, and the history of editing. Jim co-founded and led the Colored Conventions Project, and his next project, A Committee of the Whole: Social Networks of the Early Black Republic of Letters blends public humanities with digital research methods to rediscover a longer history of collective Black activism in the United States.

This event is supported by the CDH Slavic DH Working Group and Public Digital Humanities Reading Group. It is connected to the Slavic Department conference, "Grafting the Self" (October 19-21, 2017).

October 19 4:00–5:00 PM
Workshop

Geo-referencing Literary Texts and Historic Maps: A Pelagios and Pleiades Workshop

Sarah Bond

Almost every text we work with—historical or otherwise—has a spatial component to it. Whether it is mapping Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein or exploring the margins of the Mediterranean in Edward Gibbon’s The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, geography is an important part of many texts. This workshop explores the textual annotation tool within Pelagios.org’s Recogito feature, which allows professors, students, and the public to annotate, tag, and visualize locations from texts automatically. This workshop will teach you how to upload texts and easily create interactive maps to allow deeper engagement with texts. It will also introduce attendees to the basic tenets of linked open data as applied within the realm of HGIS.

Sarah Bond is an Assistant Professor of Classics at the University of Iowa, where she is also an affiliated scholar with the Digital Scholarship & Publishing Studio. She received her BA in Classics and History with a minor in Classical Archaeology from the University of Virginia (2005) and her PhD in Ancient History from the University of North Carolina (2011). She is the author of numerous articles on tradesmen and law in the later Roman empire. Her recent book, Trade and Taboo: Disreputable Professions in the Roman Mediterranean, was published with the University of Michigan Press in 2016. Additionally, she teaches GIS workshops and digital pedagogy as an associate editor for the Pleiades Project online gazetteer (a digitization of the Barrington Atlas) and is a pedagogy editor for the Pelagios Project. She is a regular columnist at Forbes, a contributor to Hyperallergic, and a frequent blogger.

November 15 12:00–1:20 PM
Guest Lecture

Digital Humanities and Social Justice

Sarah Bond

Although people have been caught up in the correct definition of the term "digital humanities," we should perhaps be more concerned with the how of DH rather than the what. This talk focuses on how digital approaches—3D modeling, augmented reality, GIS, and textual analysis, to name just a few—have begun to reveal evidence for social inequality, misogyny, racism, and marginalization. This talk highlights just a few local and international DH projects working to these ends; from redlining maps to the statistical analysis of the gender pay gap at public universities. Clearly, it is not about who is and is not a digital humanist that is the real issue in 2017. All humanists—digital or otherwise—have the power to band together in order to bring about transparency and hasten social awareness. If democracy truly "dies in darkness," then perhaps DH can contribute some flashlights to the cause.

Sarah Bond is an Assistant Professor of Classics at the University of Iowa, where she is also an affiliated scholar with the Digital Scholarship & Publishing Studio. She received her BA in Classics and History with a minor in Classical Archaeology from the University of Virginia (2005) and her PhD in Ancient History from the University of North Carolina (2011). She is the author of numerous articles on tradesmen and law in the later Roman empire. Her recent book, Trade and Taboo: Disreputable Professions in the Roman Mediterranean, was published with the University of Michigan Press in 2016. Additionally, she teaches GIS workshops and digital pedagogy as an associate editor for the Pleiades Project online gazetteer (a digitization of the Barrington Atlas) and is a pedagogy editor for the Pelagios Project. She is a regular columnist at Forbes, a contributor to Hyperallergic, and a frequent blogger.

November 15 4:30–6:00 PM