Latest Updates

Princeton Ethiopian Miracles of Mary Project Receives CDH Research Partnership Grant

Stories have been told for almost two millennia about the Virgin Mary and the miracles she has performed for the faithful who call upon her name. One of the most important collections of such folktales is the body of almost 700 Ethiopian Marian miracles, written from the 1300s through the 1900s, in the ancient African language of Gəˁəz (also known as classical Ethiopic). These tales, called the Täˀammərä Maryam (The Miracles of Mary), are central to the daily life of 50 million Ethiopians and Eritreans and of special interest at Princeton University, which has in its Firestone Library one of the largest and finest collection of Ethiopic Manuscripts, and Marian miracle manuscripts, anywhere in the world outside of Ethiopia.

Life on B Floor: My UAF Experience

My name is Wafa Isfahani, and I’m a second year MA student in Near Eastern Studies. I study Indo-Islamic thought in the 18th and 19th centuries, especially the reception of ideas of prophecy and revelation and the ways in which they were employed by South Asian thinkers in the articulation of their reformatory ideals. Besides my research, I enjoy reading Urdu poetry, listening to Indo-Pakistani ghazals, or cooking with my housemates.

Taste the Data!

This spring, I taught a new Freshman Seminar at Princeton ( FRS 154) called “Weird Data,” a CDH course sponsored by the Center for Statistics and Machine Learning. The goal of the course was to provide a wide-ranging introduction to the world of data in all its forms, ideas, and, well, weirdness. A key idea in this semester-long exploration was that data is not a single thing, nor is it usually as simple as we might assume.

DH at Princeton and Beyond: CDH Graduate Fellows Expand Their Horizons with help from Travel Grants

CDH Graduate Fellows have so many opportunities to learn about how DH is practiced at Princeton.  Throughout the spring semester, the current cohort of 10 graduate fellows met monthly to learn about and support each other’s projects, covering a vast range of subjects from conceptions of race, gender, and resistance, to 20th-century French music, to ancient Chinese texts.  Each meeting provided glimpses of new ideas, tools and techniques so that, as a group, they gained valuable skills and insights not only from their own research but from their peers’ experiences.

2019 Senior Thesis Prize: Call for Nominations

The Center for Digital Humanities is now accepting nominations for our 2019 Senior Thesis Prize, to be awarded to the thesis that best directly utilizes, engages with, or contributes to the field of digital humanities. The prize may be received by up to two students and carries an award of $1,500.

Archives, Data, and the Digital

How do we ethically engage with physical (print) archives in the twenty first century? How do we access, create, and maintain archives for global change? In short, how do we build transcontinental bridges across cultures and institutions through a shared interest in archival data?

Meet our Dataset Curation Grant Winners 2019-2020

Each year, the CDH awards several Dataset Curation Grants to Princeton researchers who are experimenting with humanities data. These grants provide training in the tools and techniques of data curation as well as funding to cover project costs and salaries for student collaborators. We are excited to announce our grantees for the 2019-20 academic year. Their projects express in different ways how new forms of argument, interpretation, and description can emerge from making, using, and maintaining data in the humanities.

Princeton’s Digital Humanists Introduce “Unsolved Data Problems” to Data and Computer Scientists

What computational challenges can a historian of the medieval Middle East, a scholar of Victorian poetry, and an experimental musician pose to a room of computer and data scientists? On March 13, three members of Princeton’s humanities faculty presented their landmark digital humanities projects in a panel discussion called “Unsolved Data Problems.”

Building Bridges with Data

How do we ethically engage with physical (print) archives in the 21st century? How do we access, create, and maintain archives for global change? In short, how do we build transcontinental bridges across cultures and institutions through a shared interest in archival data?       
Subscribe: RSS | ATOM