A Look Back at CDH’s “Year of Data” In Photos

Highlights from the Year of Data in photos
Photo highlights from the 2018-19 Year of Data.
[Banner image created by Gissoo Doroudian]

Enjoy our photo "journal" as we take a look back through 2018-19, the Year of Data, when we made new connections, built strong partnerships, and raised awareness of critical issues and best practices in working with data.

CDH Director Meredith Martin kicks off the Year of Data (or YODA as it became known) at the annual Open House in September.

CDH Director Meredith Martin kicks off the Year of Data (or YODA as it became known) at our annual Open House on September 24. (Photo: Shelley Szwast)

 

Anne Cheng, Professor of English and Director of American Studies, together with Rebecca Munson, Project and Education Coordinator at CDH, join Paul B. Muldoon, Howard G.B. Clark '21 University Professor in the Humanities, as panelists for “‘Lab’-Learning in the Humanities and Social Sciences”

Anne Cheng, Professor of English and Director of American Studies, together with Rebecca Munson, Project and Education Coordinator at CDH, joined Paul B. Muldoon, Howard G.B. Clark '21 University Professor in the Humanities, Professor of Creative Writing in the Lewis Center for the Arts, and Director of Princeton Atelier, as panelists for ‘Lab’-Learning in the Humanities and Social Sciences, a panel discussion held on  October 2 and co-organized by the CDH and the McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning. (Photo: Jean Bauer)

 

Ruha Benjamin (African American Studies) and the CDH welcomed guest speakers Lauren Klein, Director of the Digital Humanities Lab at Georgia Tech, and Mimi Onuoha, an artist, researcher and 2011 Princeton alumna, who spoke about intersectional data, bias and power at the CDH.

Ruha Benjamin (CDH Faculty Fellow, and professor of African American Studies) welcomed guest speakers Lauren Klein, Director of the Digital Humanities Lab at Georgia Tech, and Mimi Onuoha, an artist, researcher and 2011 Princeton alumna, who spoke about intersectional data, bias and power at the CDH on Oct 22. (Photo: Shelley Szwast)

 

The English Department hosted “Data Conversations,” an informal exchange among faculty and graduate students.  Meredith Martin, Mary Naydan, Elspeth Green, and Joshua Kotin (l to r) discussed topics like: defining “data” in your field; what not to do with your data; and what to know before you go to an archive.

The English Department hosted “Data Conversations,” an informal exchange among faculty and graduate students, on November 12.  Meredith Martin, Mary Naydan, Elspeth Green, and Joshua Kotin (l to r) discussed topics like: defining “data” in your field; what not to do with your data; and what to know before you visit an archive. (Photo: Jean Bauer)

 

On December 6, Safiya Umoja Noble (USC Annenberg School of Communication and Journalism), best-selling author of Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism, came to Princeton and spoke to a standing room-only crowd as the keynote speaker for Year of Data, a year-long initiative led by the CDH to encourage critical thinking about how data shapes our research, teaching, and daily lives.

On December 6,  Safiya Umoja Noble (USC Annenberg School of Communication and Journalism), best-selling author of "Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism", spoke to a standing room-only crowd as the keynote speaker for Year of Data (Photo: Shelley Szwast)

 

Jim Casey, a postdoctoral research associate of the CDH, presented at the Just Data Lab: Reimagining and Retooling Data for Justice, an all-day workshop organized into three panels, each focusing on a different social arena - housing, policing, and education - that drew on data from the Eviction Lab, Mapping Police Violence, and the Baltimore Equity Toolkit and Powermapping.

Jim Casey, CDH Postdoc (standing), was one of  many attendees at the Just Data Lab: Reimagining and Retooling Data for Justice, an all-day workshop, December 7, on housing, policing, and education that drew on data from the Eviction Lab, Mapping Police Violence, and the Baltimore Equity Toolkit and Powermapping. (Photo: Shelley Szwast)

 

The Council on Science and Technology (CST) opened their doors to non-programmers for “Playing with Data” workshops on February 21 and 28.  Aatish Bhatia (Associate Director, CST Engineering Education) and Sharon De La Cruz (Assistant Director, CST StudioLab Initiatives) led the workshops, introducing beginners to “creative coding,” or computer programming that is creative and expressive, using the p5.js web editor, a JavaScript-based program with a “sketchbook” framework aimed at artists, designers and beginners.

The Council on Science and Technology (CST) collaborated with the CDH on two workshops called“Playing with Data” February 21 and 28.  Aatish Bhatia (Associate Director, CST Engineering Education) and Sharon De La Cruz (Assistant Director, CST StudioLab Initiatives) led participants though "creative coding” exercises using the p5.js web editor, a JavaScript-based program with a “sketchbook” framework aimed at artists, designers and beginners.   (Photo: Shelley Szwast)  

 

Public Humanities was the topic of the “Building an Audience for Data” workshop on March 6, where attendees tackled the question: How does the use of data expand the range of possible audiences (and partners) for current research in the humanities?

Public Humanities was the topic of the “Building an Audience for Data,” CDH postdoc Jim Caseys' workshop on March 6, where attendees discussed how to use data to expand the range of possible audiences (and partners) for current research in the humanities. (Photo: Gissoo Doroudian)

 

On March 13, three members of Princeton’s humanities faculty  - Marina Rustow (Near Eastern Studies and History), Meredith Martin (English) and Dan Trueman (Music) - presented their landmark digital humanities projects in an panel discussion called “Unsolved Data Problems,” moderated by Jennifer Rexford, chair of Computer Science.

On March 13, three members of Princeton’s humanities faculty  - Marina Rustow (Near Eastern Studies and History), Meredith Martin (English) and Dan Trueman (Music) - presented their landmark digital humanities projects in an panel discussion called “Unsolved Data Problems,” moderated by Jennifer Rexford, chair of Computer Science.
(Photo: Sameer Khan)  

 

Students “tasted” the data in a new Freshman Seminar at Princeton ( FRS 154) called “Weird Data,” a CDH course sponsored by the Center for Statistics and Machine Learning.

Students “tasted” the data in a new Freshman Seminar at Princeton ( FRS 154) called “Weird Data,” a CDH course sponsored by the Center for Statistics and Machine Learning. (Photo: Gissoo Doroudian)

 

The Center for Digital Humanities hosted the final event in its Year of Data initiative on April 12: “Building Bridges with Data.” Nora Benedict (standing far right) led this day-long symposium and brought together eleven scholars from disparate fields to share their work as a way to think about how we can use archives and data to bridge cultures and institutions around the globe.

The Center for Digital Humanities hosted the final event in its Year of Data initiative on April 12: “Building Bridges with Data.” CDH Postdoc Nora Benedict (standing far right) led this day-long symposium and brought together scholars to think about how we can use archives and data to bridge cultures and institutions around the globe. (Photo: Shelley Szwast)  

 

Several of our Year of Data (YODA) events were co-organized with campus partners, who include the Princeton University Library, the McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning, the Graduate School, the Departments of Computer Science, History, English, and Comparative Literature, Research Computing, the Center for Statistics and Machine Learning, the Council on Science and Technology, Career Services, and the Office of the General Counsel.

Many thanks to all our sponsors for the CDH Year of Data (YODA):

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