Datasets

The following datasets were produced through research partnerships and dataset curation grants at the CDH. Each is published in an open-access repository that best fits the needs of the project, like Zenodo, Figshare, or Dataverse. Each is assigned a Digital Object Identifier (DOI), a unique string of characters assigned by an international registration agency that provides a persistent link to a resource across the internet. When publishing our data, we work hard to credit everyone who contributed to its production.

As the CDH continues to publish humanities datasets, we will add them here.

 

Derrida's Margins

 

Cite the project:

Derrida’s Margins, version 1.2.3. Center for Digital Humanities at Princeton, 2018. http://derridas-margins.princeton.edu. Accessed 04 September 2019.

Access the data:

https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.c.4256927.v1

 

A website and online research tool for annotations from the Library of Jacques Derrida, housed at Princeton University Library (PUL). Jacques Derrida is one of the major figures of twentieth-century thought, and his library––which bears the traces of decades of close reading––represents a major intellectual archive. The first phase of the project focused on annotations related to Derrida’s landmark 1967 work De la grammatologie (Of Grammatology).

 

Princeton Prosody Archive

 

Cite the project:

Princeton Prosody Archive, version 3.2.4. Center for Digital Humanities at Princeton, 2018. http://prosody.princeton.edu. Accessed 04 September 2019.

Access the data:

http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3255052

 

An incomplete, yet full-text searchable database of thousands of digitized prosodic works published between 1569 and 1923. It collects historical documents and highlights discourses about the study of language, the study of poetry, and where and how these intersect and diverge. The PPA makes several arguments and welcomes new scholarship based on the work it gathers. Some of our initial questions include: What if we began to understand poetics in all of its historical, linguistic, and educational valences? What if literary concepts such as meter and rhythm are historically contingent and fundamentally unstable? What might scholars of distant reading the novel learn from a collection of materials pertaining to the study and philosophy of poetry?