Spring 2021 Events

Reading Group

"A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man" by James Joyce

January 4 11:00–12:00 PM
The “Shakespeare and Company Project” conducts a discussion of Joyce's first novel as part of a series of explorations of titles frequently borrowed from Shakespeare and Company in Paris.
Information Session

Humanities Data Teaching Fellows Information Session

Grant Wythoff
January 27 2:00–3:00 PM
Join us for a virtual information session on a new opportunity for Princeton Ph.D. students: the Humanities Data Teaching Fellowship. Fellows will bring their humanities subject expertise to a pathbreaking data sciences curriculum development initiative. Applications are due February 12.
Discussion

Exploring Privacy Apps

January 28 1:00–2:00 PM
(InfoSec 101) - In celebration of International Data Privacy Day (January 28), the Information Security Office will discuss several software applications developed with privacy in mind.  Some applications explored include DuckDuckGo privacy services, Tor browser, Mailvelope encrypted email, and Signal messaging (encrypted instant messenger, voice, and video calling). Join us to learn about both the advantages and disadvantages of these services.
Book Talk

Book Talk: "Predict and Surveil: Data, Discretion, and the Future of Policing"

February 9 4:30–5:30 PM
Princeton alumna and Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Texas at Austin, Sarah Brayne, will speak about her new book, Predict and Surveil: Data, Discretion, and the Future of Policing.
Douglass Day Event

Abolition: Then and Now

February 13 1:00–2:15 PM
This event will feature presentations by undergraduate Princeton University students on their collaborative, virtual exhibition entitled “Abolition: Then and Now.”
Douglass Day Event

What's in a Name? A Discussion with Princeton University and Public School Students

February 13 3:00–4:30 PM
At this panel, students and teachers from Princeton Public Schools and Princeton University undergraduates will discuss their experiences advocating for recent renaming.
Discussion

From Analog to Digital: A Conversation with Professor Andrew Ollett on Open Source Philology

February 19 2:00–3:00 PM
Join the South Asia Digital Humanities Working Group for a conversation with Prof. Andrew Ollett (University of Chicago). Prof. Ollett will discuss the advantages and challenges of using open-source tools for philology with particular reference to his current project, a translation of a Prakrit work on poetics. The conversation will be moderated by Prof. Nataliya Yanchevskaya, Sanskrit lecturer in PIIRS.
Information Session

CDH Data Fellowship Information Session

Natalia Ermolaev
Rebecca Munson
February 23 11:00–12:00 PM
Are you working with spreadsheets, images or text files in your research? Are you interested in turning them into a dataset, or enhancing an existing one? Come learn more about applying for a CDH Data Fellowship in an information session with members of the CDH staff!
Discussion

Research Inside-Out: Shifting the conversation to research-as-process

February 25 12:30–2:00 PM
When we share our research, either in talks or papers, we typically focus on the “why” of the research: Why did we study this? Why should everyone care about the results? This usually comes at the expense of the “how,” which often gets tucked quietly into the inside of our presentations: How did we do our research? How did we overcome challenges in the process? How does how we handle and structure our data impact our work? Research Inside-Out is an event that aims to turn this conversation inside-out, with speakers from different disciplines presenting a research project that provides a window into the process, followed by a panel discussion with questions from the audience.
Deadline

CDH Data Fellowships Deadline

March 1 12:00–12:00 PM
The CDH Data Fellows program grew out of, and is replacing, our Dataset Curation Grants. CDH Data Fellows become familiar with the analytical and technological practices of working with humanities data. Fellows will learn to situate their work in scholarly discussions about the intersection of computational and humanistic research questions, particularly as they relate to the production, organization, and preservation of knowledge.
Discussion

How We Work: The Postdoc Experience with Jim Casey and Zoe LeBlanc

Jim Casey
Zoe LeBlanc
March 4 12:00–1:20 PM
The Center for Digital Humanities, in collaboration with GradFUTURES, is excited to launch How We Work, a new event series centered around the theme of academic work. What does it mean to work in “alternative” academia? What does it mean to pursue “traditional” academic jobs in today’s changing educational landscape? Breaking down the barrier between traditional and alternative, the series invites CDH staffers and postdocs to have open and honest conversations about their jobs, how they got there, and how they get them done.
Deadline

Seed Grant Deadline

March 15 12:00–12:00 PM
Faculty, staff and post-doctoral fellows are invited to apply for CDH Seed Grants to support individual or collaborative research projects.
Deadline

Spring 2021 Grad Fellowship Deadline

March 15 12:00–12:00 PM
Graduate Fellows in Digital Humanities explore a field of DH research or professional development during their term. No previous experience with DH or specific technical skills are required. Fellows are expected to be active participants in the life of the CDH by attending events and workshops and reaching out to CDH staff and fellow students as they explore their DH topic. Fellows attend monthly cohort meetings that provide the opportunity to workshop ideas with peers.
Guest Lecture

Why Black Bibliography Matters

March 23 4:30–6:00 PM
RBWG (Rare Book Working Group) & CDH Spring Speaker Series: Kinohi Nishikawa & Timothy Thompson
Guest Lecture

Alison Macrina: How Librarians Can Protect Privacy in the Age of Big Data

Alison Macrina
March 24 4:30–5:30 PM
Privacy is one of the core values of librarianship, but how do we protect this value when surveillance is the business model of the internet? Library Freedom Project is an organization devoted to training librarians to understand digital privacy issues and use their skills as trusted information stewards to teach communities how to protect themselves from surveillance threats.
Guest Lecture

Mukurtu, the Spalding-Allen Collection, and the Plateau Peoples’ Web Portal

March 26 3:00–4:15 PM
This illustrated presentation will describe the origins and development of the Murkutu platform with a focus on the Niimíipuu (Nez Perce) Tribe’s presentation of the Spalding-Allen Collection. 
Digital Performance

ESL: A Digital Theater Experiment

March 26 7:30–8:30 PM
ESL (English as a Second Language) is a new play for Zoom that tells the story of seven people from different cultural backgrounds taking an online language class together. When a homework assignment gets personal, the class erupts into a polyphonous debate on the limits of language and storytelling when it comes to conveying individual experiences of migration. Using the naturalistic setting of the online classroom, and drawing from its cast members' personal experiences, the play asks: How do we learn about things? How do we teach people history?
Discussion

How We Work: Academic Research Off the Tenure Track with Rebecca Munson and Grant Wythoff

Rebecca Munson
Grant Wythoff
April 13 12:00–1:20 PM
The Center for Digital Humanities, in collaboration with GradFUTURES, is excited to launch How We Work, a new event series centered around the theme of academic work. What does it mean to work in “alternative” academia? What does it mean to pursue “traditional” academic jobs in today’s changing educational landscape? Breaking down the barrier between traditional and alternative, the series invites CDH staffers and postdocs to have open and honest conversations about their jobs, how they got there, and how they get them done.