Spring 2020 Events

Workshop

Research Data Management Workshop

January 27 - 29

Join experts from across campus for a three-day workshop on research data management for graduate students, organized by the Princeton Research Data ServicePrinceton Institute for Computational Science and Engineering, and OIT Research Computing

Topics include:

  • Creating a data management plan
  • Storing, moving, preserving, and sharing data
  • Data analysis tools, including python and R
  • Tools for open research
  • Legal and ethical considerations of publishing and sharing data
  • Break-out sessions focusing on working with data from different disciplines, including humanities, sciences, engineering, and social sciences

Open to all current Princeton University graduate students with an active PU NetID. No prior knowledge of software or tools required. Seating is limited, so advanced registration is required. Participants are expected to attend all three days.

If you are unable to attend the entire workshop but would like to attend a portion, please email prds@princeton.edu, and we will add you to the wait list. If seats are available, we will do our best to accommodate.

This event is co-sponsored by the Center for Digital HumanitiesCenter for Statistics and Machine Learning, Data-Driven Social Science Initiative, Graduate SchoolOffice of the Dean for Research, and Princeton University Library. 

Workshop and Colloquium

Digital Musicology Workshop: "Corpus Analysis: Distant Listening of Musical Scores"

Michael Scott Cuthbert
February 7 10:00–12:00 PM

WORKSHOP 

Date: Friday, February 7, 2020 

Time: 10:00-12:00pm

Location: The Center for Digital Humanities (Firestone Library Floor B)

Abstract:  Hands-on workshop on Music21, an open-source toolkit for computer-aided musical analysis.

Confirmation: Due to limited seating, please confirm your attendance using the following form:

https://forms.gle/pzKWmiGXRggeDZQGA

Speaker Bio:  

Michael Scott Cuthbert, Faculty Director of Digital Humanities and Associate Professor of Music at the MIT, is a musicologist who has worked extensively on music of the 14th century, computational musicology, and digital humanities. Cuthbert’s research lab has produced “music21,” an open-source toolkit for computer-aided musical analysis, which has an installed user base in the tens of thousands. He directs MIT’s programs in Digital Humanities, which creates code to educate and solve problems across disciplines.  Cuthbert’s current book project covers sacred music in Italy during the Black Death and Great Schism. 

Sponsorship: The Center for Digital Humanities and Department of Music

 

 

COLLOQUIUM

Date: Friday, February 7, 2020 

Time: 2:30-4:30pm

Location: Woolworth 106 (Department of Music)

Title of Talk: Music Decoding: Forgetting Perfection, Finding Results in Digital Musicology 

Abstract:  When musicologists make a decision to engage with the digital humanities, they are often encouraged to join in “music encoding”.  The process of creating digital scholarly editions (think Urtext or M2) might feel like the twenty-first century continuation of the long, distinguished, and noble discipline of critical editing within musicology.  “Learn the Music Encoding Initiative—MEI— and join the future,” speak panel after panel at AMS and other musicology conferences.  But what past Gesamtausgaben and other scholarly editions long possessed, MEI scores lack: that is, readers.  Computational musicology’s emphasis on perfect digital editions that cannot be decoded or read by anyone outside of the projects themselves sets it far behind music analysis projects created by outsiders—theorists, composers, scientists, and programmers—who understand that decoding music is at least as important as encoding it.  The paper uses results from imperfect encodings and un-critical editions to make claims about style and borrowing in popular and medieval music that are possible by prioritizing what we want to get out of digital humanities over what we want to put in. 

Sponsorship: The Center for Digital Humanities and Department of Music

Information Session

Grant Info Session

Natalia Ermolaev
Rebecca Munson
Grant R. Wythoff
February 11 12:00–1:00 PM

Learn about all of the grant opportunities the CDH has to offer this Spring! 

Social

Douglass Day 2020

February 14 12:00–3:00 PM

Celebrate the chosen birthday of activist and writer Frederick Douglass through a crowd-sourced transcription project.

Members of the public, along with staff, faculty, and students, are invited to enjoy some cake and participate in an online crowd-sourcing project focusing on Anna Julia Cooper (1858 – 1964), a visionary writer, teacher, and activist who championed education for African Americans and women.

Participants will help transcribe Cooper’s papers, held by the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center. No experience is required to help preserve these important historical documents.

This event joins dozens of other celebrations being held simultaneously across the U.S. and abroad. Come when you can, bring a laptop, and leave when you like.

Click here for more about Douglass Day.

Registration is requested. Click here to RSVP.

This program is presented in partnership with the Historical Society of Princeton, the Princeton Public Library, and the Princeton University Center for Digital Humanities

National Partners: Anna Julia Cooper Digital Project; Moorland-Spingarn Research Center at Howard University; Princeton University Center for Digital Humanities; Pennsylvania State University Libraries, Center for Humanities and Information, and College of Liberal Arts; The Colored Conventions Project.

Reading Group

HathiTrust and the Princeton Prosody Archive

Rebecca Sutton Koeser
Meredith Martin
Eleanor Dickson Koehl
February 19 12:00–1:20 PM

HathiTrust is a massive digital library accessible to Princeton researchers. It is both a resource for close reading and a trove of textual data. Join us as we explore one use case of HathiTrust, the Princeton Prosody Archive, as well as learn more about the tools and data for computational text analysis provided by HathiTrust and the HathiTrust Research Center.

Please register via the Library event page.

 

Reading Group

Making the most of the CDH Seed Grants

Bobbi Coffey
Andi Johnson
Steve Knowlton
February 24 12:00–1:20 PM

Each year, the Center for Digital Humanities (CDH) welcomes librarians to submit proposals for the Seed Grants. The 2020 deadline is March 13. 

Join our three librarians to learn more about how they conceived of their projects, wrote their proposals and implemented their projects:

  • Steve's project collects memories of public libraries from oral histories of prominent African Americans, which will be subjected to qualitative analysis to identify themes for use in writing a social history.

SEED grants help librarians to think through project ideas that are in the early stages, and also help build connections with faculty who are exploring related topics. CDH staff will also describe how to apply for a Dataset Curation grant, where grantees learn best practices for working with humanities data and publish their own original dataset. Bring your questions and ideas along! 

Deadline

Dataset Curation Grant Deadline

March 2 12:00–12:00 AM

CDH Dataset Curation Grants familiarize recipients with the analytical and technological practices of working with humanities data. Grantees are taught best practices in data selection, gathering, modeling, cleaning, transformation, and maintenance, with the aim of producing a research dataset suitable for computational analysis. We seek applicants who are interested in participating in the CDH’s ongoing conversation about methodological, cultural, and ethical questions raised by curating humanities data.  

For more information and to apply, see here.

Deadline

Research Partnership Grant Deadline

March 2 12:00–12:00 AM

The CDH is seeking full-time faculty research partners for AY 2020-2021. Partners will work with the CDH to produce new tools and/or digital scholarship at the intersection of humanities and information technology.

Click here for more information and to apply. 

Deadline

Seed Grant Deadline

March 13 12:00–12:00 AM

Faculty, staff and post-doctoral fellows are invited to apply for CDH Seed Grants to support individual or collaborative research projects.

Deadline: March 13, 2020 

Awards of up to $1,000 are intended to support exploratory thinking and early-stage development for projects that may eventually become CDH collaborations. 

Please see https://cdh.princeton.edu/grants/seed-grants/ for details and application requirements.

Deadline

Fall 2020 Grad Fellowship Deadline

March 13 12:00–12:00 AM

Graduate Fellows in Digital Humanities explore a field of DH research or professional development during their term. No previous experience with DH or specific technical skills are required. Fellows are expected to be active participants in the life of the CDH by attending events and workshops and reaching out to CDH staff and fellow students as they explore their DH topic. Fellows attend monthly cohort meetings that provide the opportunity to workshop ideas with peers.

For more info and to apply, see here.

Workshop

Data Spring Cleaning: Data Shelves, Closets, and Attics

May 8 1:00–2:00 PM

Join the discussion and exchange tips on how to better organize your active data files and keep your analysis workspace free from clutter. A zoom link will be provided by email.

This event is part of Princeton Research Data Service Discussion Series, Data Spring Cleaning: Or, How Can We Help Your Data “Spark Joy”?

Questions? Contact Neggin Keshavarzian at neggink@princeton.edu.

To request accommodations for this event, please contact pulcomm@princeton.edu at least 3 working days in advance. 

Workshop

Preparing Data for Publication: Overview

May 11 1:00–2:00 PM

An overview of how to get your data ready to be published, starting with organization to choose the best repository. A zoom link will be provided by email.

This event is part of Princeton Research Data Service Discussion Series, Preparing Data for Publication.

To request accommodations for this event, please contact pulcomm@princeton.edu at least 3 working days in advance.

Workshop

Preparing Data for Publication: Organizing Data: Best Practices

May 12 11:00–11:30 AM

Deeper dive into documenting and describing your data to optimize discovery and reuse. A zoom link will be provided by email.

This event is part of Princeton Research Data Service Discussion Series, Preparing Data for Publication.

To request accommodations for this event, please contact pulcomm@princeton.edu at least 3 working days in advance. 

Workshop

Preparing Data for Publication: Readmes and Documentation

May 12 1:00–1:30 PM

Deeper dive into documenting and describing your data to optimize discovery and reuse. A zoom link will be provided by email.

This event is part of Princeton Research Data Service Discussion Series, Preparing Data for Publication.

To request accommodations for this event, please contact pulcomm@princeton.edu at least 3 working days in advance. 

Workshop

Preparing Data for Publication: Discovery and Reuse

May 13 11:00–11:30 AM

Deeper dive into data discovery and reuse. A zoom link will be provided by email.

This event is part of Princeton Research Data Service Discussion Series, Preparing Data for Publication.

Questions? Contact Neggin Keshavarzian at neggink@princeton.edu.

To request accommodations for this event, please contact pulcomm@princeton.edu at least 3 working days in advance. 

Workshop

Preparing Data for Publication: Generalist and Discipline-specific Repositories - What to Look For

May 13 1:00–1:30 PM

Deeper dive into deciding where to put your data. A zoom link will be provided by email.

This event is part of Princeton Research Data Service Discussion Series, Preparing Data for Publication.

Questions? Contact Neggin Keshavarzian at neggink@princeton.edu.

To request accommodations for this event, please contact pulcomm@princeton.edu at least 3 working days in advance. 

Workshop

Preparing Data for Publication: Citing Data

May 14 11:00–11:30 AM

Deeper dive into how to cite data. A zoom link will be provided by email.

This event is part of Princeton Research Data Service Discussion Series, Preparing Data for Publication.

Questions? Contact Neggin Keshavarzian at neggink@princeton.edu.

To request accommodations for this event, please contact pulcomm@princeton.edu at least 3 working days in advance. 

Working Group

Public Humanities Working Group

May 14 12:00–1:00 PM

The second and final session in the Spring 2020 Public Humanities Working Group series. Participants are welcome to bring their own lunch to this virtual meeting.

Join us for monthly conversations with faculty, graduate students, and staff from across the university to think together about our shared humanistic work and its larger, public implications outside of university life, and to consider more largely the value and relevance of the humanities in our present moment.

To RSVP and receive our common readings, please contact Kate Thorpe, kthorpe@princeton.edu.

Speakers:

Martha A. Sandweiss
Professor of History
Princeton University

Jim Casey
Postdoctoral Research Associate
Center for Digital Humanities
Princeton University

Julia Grummitt
Doctoral Candidate in History
Princeton University

Elena M’Bouroukounda
Master’s Candidate in Architecture
Princeton University

Read about Council working groups here.

RSVP required

Reading Group

Newspaper Navigator: Reimagining Digitized Newspapers with Machine Learning

May 15 11:30–12:30 PM

To register for this event, visit the event listing on the PUL website.

Presented by Ben Lee, a 2020 Innovator-in-Residence at the Library of Congress

Ben writes: The 16-million digitized, historic newspaper pages within Chronicling America, a joint initiative by the Library of Congress and the NEH, represent an incredibly rich resource for a wide range of users. Historians, journalists, genealogists, students, and members of the American public explore the collection regularly via keyword search. But how do we navigate the abundant visual content? Newspaper Navigator is a project that I am currently carrying out while an Innovator-in-Residence at the Library of Congress, in collaboration with Library of Congress Labs, the National Digital Newspaper Program, and my PhD advisor, Professor Daniel Weld, at the University of Washington. Newspaper Navigator consists of two parts. The first is to extract headlines, images, illustrations, maps, comics, and editorial cartoons from millions of newspaper pages by training an image recognition model on thousands of crowdsourced annotations collected by the Library of Congress’s Beyond Words initiative. The second part of Newspaper Navigator is to reimagine how we can navigate this wealth of visual content through an exploratory search interface, enabling users to define queries for concepts of their own choosing (which I refer to as “open faceted search”).

In this talk, I will share my current progress with Newspaper Navigator, including running the visual content recognition pipeline at scale. I will also discuss how this project, including the resulting datasets and search interface, can contribute to both computer science research and research within digital humanities.

Read more about the Newspaper Navigator project.

This event is part of the 2019-20 Collections as Data Discussion Series.

Year of Data

Reading Group

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