Viewing posts for the category Designing Empire

Reconstructing Dunkirk's fortifications, and multiple networks of communication

Digital humanities is a remarkable method of identifying historical connections hidden in traditional, analogue historical analysis. As I wrote in November 2015, “Historians soon learn that not all that is present is easily visible.” Even relatively small networks, such as the Dunkirk urban intelligence network, profit immensely from digital humanities tools such as Cytoscape, Mindnode, and Palladio.

Bringing the Dunkirk urban intelligence network to life

The digital humanities landscape has changed substantially in the past year. Google Earth, the most user-friendly and widely available GIS-style platform, will cease operation at the end of 2015. Some of its services will be rolled into Google Maps. But the future for Google Earth’s technical drawing and polygon functions is unknown. Support for Gephi, the most widely used network analysis software in the humanities, has unofficially ceased; no new updates have been available since January 2013. Gephi does not operate well with Apple’s latest OSX El Capitain update, and no word has yet been forthcoming as to when such operability issues will be addressed. In the interim humanities and social science experts are increasingly shifting to Cytoscape. Originally designed with National Institute of General Medical Sciences funding to map genome, molecular, and biological pathways, Cytoscape now enjoys growing popularity in the digital humanities community. 

 

©2016 Trustees of Princeton University